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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  October 30, 2017 3:00am-4:00am PDT

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sign, sealed and soon to be revealed. monday is expected to be indictment day in robert mueller's russia investigation. will there be an arrest? also tonight, puerto rico pulls the plug on its $300 million contract with whitefish energy. exactly five years after superstorm sandy, the hardest hit areas are still recovering. what exactly is taking so long? >> at the home of america's fourth president, the descendants of slaves get in touch with their roots. >> i want to be a part of telling my family story. >> in a budget showdown. thousand of wild horses could lose more than their home on the range. now the big fear is that the government will legalize the slaughter of these horses.
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welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. president trump has dismissed the russia investigation as a pointless witch-hunt. but the first criminal suspect could be unmasked on the eve of halloween. sources tell cbs news, a federal grand jury has approved special councsel robert mueller's first charges in the case an arrest could come as early as today. in a hail of tweets the president shrugged off the looming charges suggesting in capital letters that the spotlight be turned instead toward hillary clinton. here is justice reporter paula reid. >> bob mueller has a really distinguished career of service to our country. >> republican called for his party to keep an open mind as they await the first charges from special counsel robert mueller. >> i would encourage republican friend give the guy a chance to do his job.
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the result will be known by the facts. >> the sealed indictment could become public as early as monday. but it is not known who could be charged. mueller has been given authority to investigate any connection between the trump campaign and russia. his probe has broadened to include investigations into former trump campaign manager paul manafort, mike flynn and possible obstruction of justice in firing of james comey. the democrat believes manafort has information that could be useful to mueller. >> we know that the russian government through intermediaries was reaching out to the trump campaign, paul manafort and offering information on hillary clinton they thought would help the trump campaign and that the campaign was willing and accepted that idea. >> former u.s. attorney says the first arrest is likely to be someone who has information that can advance the overall investigation. >> prosecutors like those in my
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former office and those that work in bob mueller's office now try to see who they can bring charges against first. see if they have information asome someone else. >> threat of in diedictment can provide incentive to cooperate, if the person charged works with special counsel it is possible charges could remain under seal and won't see any arrests this week. eve lane. >> paula, thank you. earlier i spoke with our chief washington correspondent, and "face the nation" host john dickerson. john, what does news of an indictment mean politically speaking? >> depend on who the indictment its aimed at. a minor character on the fringe of this story, it won't mean very much. in fact, you can imagine, now really getting into the either here of speculation, but if it is a, a side lined figure not related to the president, it's possible to imagine the
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president would take heart from that and say that it proves this is a witch-hunt. on the other hand if it is somebody close to the trump campaign then it would require all kinds of responses both from the president and his team. that would create volatility. >> senator collins told you sunny wants several key players from hillary clinton's 2016 white house run to appear again before the senate intelligence committee on the issue of the dossier. how does the week's news change the narrative of the russian investigation? >> this certainly helps the president. make his case, or at least before this indictment news came forward, about what the clinton team was up to. really there are two separate things. and so, particularly with respect off to the senate intelligence committee, senator collins was saying that the, the lawyer who we know was involved with this creation of the dossier, spending money on it, was at the, at the table with john podesta chairman of the clinton campaign when he said he
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knew nothing how it was funded. that lawyer will now according to senator collins should come back and testify owe posed as some one going along with john podesta. jo john dickerson, thank you very much. tropical storm felipe brought heavy rain and gusts to south florida. now another system is plowing through the northeast states. chief meteorologist craig setzer tracking the storm at cbs miami wfor. what's the latest, craig? >> the latest tropical storm felipe is not going to be a bts now it is moving to sea. it is off the east coast of florida. heading to the northeast. but the moisture from felipe is going to contribute to the already powerful storm system that is working its way across the eastern u.s. heavy rainfall stretching from the mid-atlantic on up into the northeast and new england and new york. heavy rainfall is going to increase as the that tropical moisture component continues to be an influence into the system.
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some isolated amounts could exceed four inches maybe a few spotty six inch accounts. that could cause widespread flash flooding. another big issue with the system is the wind. very, very strong wind. coming southerly. unlike a nor'easter where we have the northeast winds. southerly wind coming to new york, new england, southern new england, tonight. during the day tomorrow, central, northern new england. large trees could be blown down. with widespread power outages, wind gusts could be up to 70 miles an hour. elaine once the storm system moves out. cooler air forecast to move in. >> craig, thank you. on this football sunday, the houston texans game plan included a show of unity against remarks made by their team's owner. >> reporter: as the the houston texans warmed up for their game sunday, the controversy over comments made by team owner bob mcnair was growing. at a mid october nfl owners meeting about how to deal with players' protests during the national anthem. mcnair said we can't have the
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inmates running the prison. >> can't say i'm surprised. >> dwayne brown called the comment disrespectful. >> this is the view of player/owner relationship. this its how you view us. this is, you get a line, you are an inmate. >> saturday, mcnair met with players and issued a second apology. saying in a statement i was not referring to the players when i made a regretful comment. the relationship between the league office and team owners. but players across the nfl have reacted strongly. seattle seahawks' quarterback richard sherman. don't apologize. you mint what you said. showing true color as lose people to see you for who you are. >> the conflict at a crucial time for the nfl. ♪ by the dawn's early light which has been in talks with players about concerns over issues like racial injustice. those concerns have led players
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across the league to kneel for >> dr. stanley: remember this: cannot change the laws of god. when he has visited you in some form of adversity and he brings you through that, that's like he has increased the strength of the foundation of your life and your faith in him. [music]
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this is the cbs "overnight news." a storm of controversy forced puerto rico to pull the plug on a deal with whitefish energy. the tiny company in montana had been awarded a huge contract to restore electricity knocked out by hurricane maria. here is david begnaud. >> in the interest of protecting our public interests, i have asked the board of the power authority to evoke the cancellation clause in the contract immediately. >> puerto rico's governor, made the announcement, less than a week after it was revealed. that a small montana based company had secured a $300 million contract to restore the island's power grid.
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that contract was not open to competitive bidding. >> it is interfering with, with everything. and it doesn't go toward the best interest of the people of puerto rico. >> right now getting our bucket trucks up. >> reporter: almost daily whitefish energy tweeted progress updates. recently claimed to have more than 325 workers, starting to re-establish power. the mayor of san juan, carmen cruz vigorously questioned legality of the whitefish contract. >> rather than repealing the contract. it should be voided. why, a little clause in the contract that states, that if they cancel the contract or in any way eliminates it, white fish will get reasonable profit of what they have already charged us for. >> whitefish energy a 2-year-old company based in affluent area of northwestern montana. the company ceo said he will cooperate with any and all information requests from government agencies. if the governor of puerto rico
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gets his way, the contract is canceled. the governor now wants yous brought in from new york and florida. how did whitefish first get in contact with puerto rican power authority. turns out ceo of whitefish gave an interview he reached out to the puerto ricans through the website linkedin. elaine. >> thank you. >> five years ago, superstorm sandy slammed into the northeast. parts of new york and new jersey were devastated. it was the second costliest storm in u.s. history. more than $70 billion in damage. half a decade later many are still struggling. five years after hurricane sandy, residents in new york are still recovering as their homes undergo extensive renovations, are being razeed or rebuilt. in 2013, 20,000 flood victims registered for assistance to rebuild or replace their homes. >> 250, 300 homes, elevating rebuilding in the community.
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amy peterson director of the build it back program says she can help less than half. >> as you know there has been criticism though the process has been cumbersome, confusing. and that early on there was a lack of communication. what is your response to that? >> sandy was a disaster no one had seen. the build it back program had problems at the start. >> 189 of 500 homes. 370 out of 850 razed. five years later what exactly is taking so long? >> what happened a lot were able to return home. we felt it was important to elevate their homes and make them safe. four years after the storm. last year they move out. we elevate their homes. then they will be safe for the future. >> this has been a painful. long process. for many of my residents. >> new york city councilman, represents a dozen ineligible coney island residents who live in rowhomes. >> many federal rules and policies don't take into account the urban landscape of new york
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city. >> pamela and her neighbors want action. >> do we want elevation, yes? yes. that is the only way we can save our homes. we have, we all have 4'7" in our living room of, of sewer, disgusting water from the creek from the sewer lines. en our home. the only hope we have is elevation. insurance will be in excess of $10,00ye are on fixed incomes. we will lose our homes. >> these folks should not be on their own. we need organizations, funded by the government, to help a system, every step of the way. >> one critical lesson officials say they learned is the importance of tying the city's initial disaster response to longer term recovery efforts. coming up -- a diplomatic crisis in the middle east. four american allies against another u.s. ally. later, animal advocates say the
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60% of women are wearing the wrong size pad and can experience leaks discover always my fit. find the number that's right for your flow and panty size on the top of any always pack. the better the fit, the better it protects. always. a diplomatic crisis is heating up along the persian gulf. between saudi arabia and iran. for months, qatar has been under a blockade by its arab neighbors who accused the tiny nation of supporting terror groups. all of the countries involved are american allies, and the u.s. has a large air base in qatar. charlie rose sat down with the
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emir of qatar for "60 minutes." >> qatar, built the air base to american specifications. 365 days a year, 24/7, u.s. allied aircraft take off from qatar's desert to strike targets in afghanistan, iraq, and syria. 10,000 americans and coalition forces operate out of the sprawling air base. it may be why president trump after initially tweeting support of the blockade now seems eager to end it. you have heard that the president said this cannot happen. >> i have heard that. heard that this cannot continue. should end. i heard that. >> we cannot tolerate an invasion from outside by our friends against another friend. >> he told me very clearly, i will not accept my friend fighting amongst themselves. you are fearful of that? >> fearful if anything happens, any military act happens, this region will be in chaos.
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>> it is said the president has asked you to come to camp david have you accepted the invitation? >>y, yes, i met with the presidt in new york a few weeks ago. >> for the united nations? >> for the united nations. >> the president showed he is commit to find an end to the crisis. yes it is true, he suggested that we come, i told him straight away, mr. president, we are very ready. i have been asking for dialogue from day one. >> what did the other countries say? >> it was supposed to be soon this meeting. i don't have any response. >> overseas, hundreds of thousand took to the streets of barcelona, to demand catalonia remain a part of spain. they've call themselves the silent majority that does not want independence from madrid. seth doane is there. >> the spanish flag was planted in barcelona today. on backs, pets, and flown overhead. >> the world has to see that we are not two or three. >> in fact they were hundred of
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thousand. supporting the central government. >> the people around me here are shouting we are also catalon. long live spain. catalonia is part of spain. they tell us their voices were not heard in that stroet for independence. the leader of the independence effort refused to step down despite being sacked from his job as president. he has been invited to participate in the december election if he is not in jail as the threatened by spanish prosecutors. spain's foreign minister argued today no one is going to listen to the president. >> if he wants to live in a parallel universe, he may go on. but nobody i think is going to, obey to him. >> reporter: a fight for unity, on many fronts. ♪ ♪ seth doane, cbs news, barcelona. >> still ahead, tens of tho
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president trump's proposed budget ignited a battle in the wild west between the livestock industry and animal rights activi activists. a dispute over grazing territory. tens of thousand of wild horses coulden end up being slaughtere. mg in beaver county, utah, wild horses of every color from charcoal to caramel, charge
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across the range. a symbol of the great american west. one that is multiplying by 20% a year. >> just in the last ten years we have gone from, 30,000 to, over 70,000. >> what happened? >> within the last three years, we pretty much quit gathering. >> for decade. the bureau of land management, rounded up excess horses and placed them in private ranches and feed lots until they ran out of space. >> now, the big fear is that the government will legalize the slaughter of the horses and under president trump's proposed budget wild horse management program would lose $10 million in funding. the spending plan would also remove language from a 1971 act, that would open the door for wholesale destruction. >> they're under attack. by our on government. >> wild horse advocate, has dedicated her life to protecting these majestic mustangs. >> are there too many wild horses now.
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>> absolutely not an overpopulation problem of wild horses. what we have is discrimination probl problem. >> across ten states. 26.9 million acres of public land are set aside for wild horses. meanwhile there are 155 million acres for live stock. deep in the desert mountains, outside millford. cattle rancher, mark winch says the range is under attack with too many horses devouring the forage. >> trucking cattle. 150 miles. in the past able to herd them ten miles. >> is that the answer to slaughter the wild horses. >> what do you do with your cats and dogs too many in the city. do you let them run rampant. >> wild horse advocate want time to try contraception to control the population. time is running out. a new federal budget could make scenes like this history. meg oliver, cbs news, beaver county, utah.
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we end tonight at the virginia home of president james madison. father of the constitution, and architect of the bill of rights. the plantation was also home to generations of slaves whose descendants have a chance to get in touch with their roots. chip reid paid a visit. >> on the ground of james madison's mount pellier they're searching for buried treasure. >> show me what you found? >> i found a marble. >> a marble.
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not riches they're after. long forgotten objects that tell a richer story about the slaves who once lived here. she has family roots in this area. >> could this be connected to you in some way? jean l >> if it didn't attach to me and my bloodline it attached to someone's child. who ever touched this the last time i feel like i'm bonded with that person. >> reporter: visitors here now learn about a lot more than james and dolley madison. cat imhoff is president and ceo of mount pellier. >> now there is a new exhibit here, devoted entirely to montpelier's slaves, featuring objects unearthed. >> we wanted them to come home. put their hand in the soil. be part of uncovering, making what has been invisible, visible. >> some of michelle taylor's
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ancestors were enslaved here. her passion for learning about them helped her decide on a career as a professional archaeologist. >> i want to be a part of, telling my family story. and i want to be part using my hand to find the information myself. >> matt reeves director of archaeology here has been an archaeologist for 30 years. >> do you still get excited when you find something in the ground? >> absolutely. >> reporter: he says the thrill is magnified when those doing the finding include descendants of slaves. >> finding objects their ancestors owned, the last folks who touched the objects was one of their ancestors is almost spiritual. so inspiring. >> reporter: inspiring people of all race to work together to uncover american history. chip reid, cbs news, montelier. >> incredibly important. that's the "overnight news" for monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new
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york city, i'm elaine quijano. welcome to the "overnight news." i'm elaine quijano. president trump has dismissed the russia investigation as a pointless witch-hunt. but the first criminal suspect could be unmasked on the eve of halloween. sources tell cbs news, a federal grand jury has approved special counsel robert mueller's first charges in the case. and an arrest could come as early as today. in a hail of tweets the president shrugged off the looming charges, suggesting in capital letters that the spotlight be turned instead toward hillary clinton. here is justice reporter paula reid. >> bob mueller has a really distinguished career of service to our country. >> reporter: the republican called for his party to keep an
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open mind as they await first charges from special counsel robert mueller. >> gift guy a chance to do his job. >> the sealed indictment could become public as early as monday. not known who could be charged. mueller has been given the authority to investigate any connection between the trump campaign and russia. his probe has broadened to include parallel investigations into former trump campaign manager, paul manafort. mike flynn and questions about possible obstruction of justice in the firing of james comey. democrat adam shif believes manafort has information that could be useful to mueller. we know the russian government was reaching out to the trump campaign. paul manafort and others offering information on hillary clinton they thought would help the trump campaign. that the campaign was willing and accepted that idea. >> former u.s. attorney, says
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the first arrest is likely to be some one who has information that can advance the overall investigation. >> prosecutors like those in my former office and those that work in bob mueller's office now try to see who they can bring charges against first. see if they have information asome someone else. >> threat of indictment can provide incentive to cooperate, if the person charged works with special counsel it is possible charges could remain under seal and won't see any arrests this week. elaine. >> paula, thank you. republican senator susan collins of maine sits on the intelligence committee which is conducting its own russia investigation. she discussed part of their work with john dickerson of "face the nation." >> let me ask you about the so-called dossier, information gathered of all kind, about candidate trump. "the washington post" reported this week that the clinton campaign and the democratic national committee donated, paid
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for, part of its creation. john podesta, clinton campaign manager, and debbie wauserman schultz came before the committee and said we don't know who paid for this. before "the washington post" report. sitting next to podesta was the lawyer from the clinton campaign who paid for the report. do they need to come back sit down and tell the committee what is up? >> they absolutely need to be recalled. it is difficult to imagine that a campaign chairman, that the head of the dnc, would not know of an expennditure of this magnitude and significance. perhaps there is something more going on here. certainly it is worth additional questioning of the two witnesses. >> and, and what about the, the -- clinton campaign lawyer. >> absolutely. and more than anyone. >> a storm of controversy forced puerto rico today to pull the plug on a deal with white fish energy. the tiny company in montana had been awarded a huge contract, to
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restore electricity knocked out by hurricane maria. here is david begnaud. >> in the interest of protecting our public interests, i have asked the board of the power authority to evoke the cancellation clause in the contract immediately. >> puerto rico's governor, made the announcement, less than a week after it was revealed. that a small montana based company had secured a $300 million contract to restore the island's power grid. that contract was not open to competitive bidding. >> it is interfering with, with everything. and it doesn't go toward the best interest of the people of puerto rico. >> right now getting our bucket trucks up. >> reporter: almost daily whitefish energy tweeted progress updates. recently claimed to have more than 325 workers, starting to re-establish power. the mayor of san juan, carmen cruz vigorously questioned legality of the whitefish contract. >> rather than repealing the contract. it should be voided.
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why, a little clause in the contract that states, that if they cancel the contract or in any way eliminates it, white fish will get reasonable profit of what they have already charged us for. >> whitefish energy a 2-year-old company based in affluent area of northwestern montana. the company ceo said he will cooperate with any and all information requests from government agencies. if the governor of puerto rico gets his way, the contract is canceled. the governor now wants yous brought in from new york and florida. how did whitefish first get in contact with puerto rican power authority. turns out ceo of whitefish gave an interview he reached out to the puerto ricans through the website linkedin. elaine. >> thank you. >> five years ago, superstorm sandy battered the northeast.
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parts of new york and new jersey were devastated. it was the second costliest storm in u.s. history. more than $70 billion in damage. half a decade later many are still struggling. five years after hurricane sandy, residents in new york are still recovering as their homes undergo extensive renovations, are being razed or rebuilt. in 2013, 20,000 flood victims registered for assistance to rebuild or replace their homes. >> 250, 300 homes, elevating rebuilding in the community. amy peterson director of the build it back program says she can help less than half. >> as you know there has been criticism though the process has been cumbersome, confusing. and that early on there was a lack of communication. what is your response to that? >> sandy was a disaster no one had seen. the build it back program had
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problems at the start. >> 189 of 500 homes. 370 out of 850 razed. five years later what exactly is taking so long? >> what happened a lot were able to return home. we felt it was important to elevate their homes and make them safe. four years after the storm. last year they move out. we elevate their homes. then they will be safe for the future. >> this has been a painful. long process. for many of my residents. >> new york city councilman, represents a dozen ineligible coney island residents who live in rowhomes. >> many federal rules and policies don't take into account the urban landscape of new york city. >> pamela and her neighbors want action. >> do we want elevation, yes? yes. that is the only way we can save our homes. we have, we all have 4'7" in our living room of, of sewer, disgusting water from the creek from the sewer lines. en our home. the only hope we have is elevation. insurance will be in excess of $10,000 a year. we are on fixed incomes. we will lose our homes. >> these folks should not be on
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a new report on climate change shows september's arctic sea ice coverage was 25% less than it was in 2010. and that's just one of the problems facing america's only arctic state. alaska. jeff glor took a trip north to see the changes under way. >> we're flying over the tundra, an area, subarctic. for the past decade. sue natelli has been taking trips like this. deep in the remote corners of alaska's wilderness. >> the area has been thawing for several decade now. >> her mission, monitor how
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warming temperatures are impacting the frozen earth underground. we have come via helicopter to see the alaskan tundra from above. not far from denali national park. 25% of the northern hemisphere land area includes permafrost. >> frozen ground. it is ground that remains below zero degrees celsius for two or more years. >> water, rocks, soil. >> everything in that ground that is frozen is permafrost. >> that term is misleading. because as she and field scientists are learning. >> find a nice good flat south. the isa soaresy soil, under the spongy moss is anything but permanent. arctic permafrost warmed 2 degrees celsius and predict 20% may thaw by 2040. she uses this drill to extract
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permafrost, a few feet under the surface and can extend 100 feet down. organic material from dead, decayed. plants and animals. >> this is a core. >> this is how we sample. >> some frozen for thousand of years as the it thaws the organic material releases gasses, melt in a and carbon dioxide, the so-called green house gasses that warm the atmosphere. >> projections for the larger permafrost region. 150 billion tons of car been released by 2100. >> based on current emissions the u.s. its expected to release that much car been over the same time period burning fossil fuels. this thawing permafrost would effectie double the figure. >> inside the permafrost tunnel. >> best view of permafrost from underground. in this 50-year-old tunnel. built, maintained by the u.s.
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army corps of engineers outside fairbanks. >> see, massive frozen structures that have formed over tens of thousand of years. >> down here it is easy to visualize another danger posed by thawing ground. >> you can imagine itch this, permafrost thaws, you will have substantial ground collapse. off awe it is happening in alaska. forest of trees, bent or toppled over. road like rollest coer tracks. neighborhoods of homes, buckling into uneven ground. >> originally the surface was flat. >> university of alaska researcher, studies permafrost loss, using hundreds of sensors. he says data from all most all the stations points to the same trend. awe off is it really warm. really close to freezing point. so it is actually, very, very vulnerable now. >> right on the line there? >> yes, right on the line. borderline. awe off tomorrow, is halloween.
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and when you get back from trick-or-treating you may want to treat yourself off to a scary movie. lee cowen paid a visit off to the home of mr. halloween himself. director john carpenter. [ "halloween" music plays ] >> on a bright southern california day this otherwise cheerful house feels sinister. thanks to that hauntingy familiar theme echoing from some where inside. john carpenter was just a few years out of usc film school when he come posed it. add melodic to his classic halloween. repetition, audience is waiting for something to change. >> putting you on your nerves. like what, what, let's get this thing changing. come on. stop this repeating over and over and over. >> driving me crazy. >> that's it.
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at 69. but remember, carpenter wrote and directed the film too. unleashing michael myers to the world. >> you can't kill the bookieman. >> ah! >> a lot of it is to know huma natural. he had no character. he was blank. he was simply evil. he is like the wind. he is out there. he is going to get you. and that's what's most terrifying. >> oh, hell, yeah, what you don't know about. what you can't see that's out there. >> reporter: released almost 40 years ago. halloween launched jamie lee curtis to stardom and made carpenter the king of things that go bump in the night. >> i was just this kid with long hair trying to make a movie with a bunch of cute actresses that's
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all. >> look what came out of it? >> great. i was lucky. it was fun. god it was fun. >> the critics weren't enthusiastic at first. but word of mouth soon spread. it became one of most profitable independent films of its time. >> i remember this famous screening where i got this, just, to sit outside and listen to the audience scream at halloween. it was lake a symphony. the most beautiful thing i have ever heard. they screamed at all the places i wanted them to scream. and i thought, oh, man that's something. there half been so many halloween seek wumquels it is h count. >> my idea never make a sequel. >> didn't want to? >> no story left. nothing left to say. boy was i wrong, huh. >> carpenter is long passed being asked what scares him. he always seemed to tap into what scared us. whether it was death, lurking in
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fog. >> reverse. reverse. >> possessed plymouth in christine. or evil awakened in prince of darkness. and he come posed the themes for all of them. and he composed the themes for all of them. ♪ ♪ >> i was going to say most people directing a film is enough work. scoring one on top of it. >> show you how stupid i am. >> in fact there are so many, he put them on a new movie theme album, called anthology. he is about to head out on tour. despite it although he has one more score yet to write. the one to what he insists will be the last halloween sequel. he is executive producing and he
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is bringing jamie lee curtis back as well. >> can you give us a little sneak? >> no, not going to give you anything. >> a little something. >> it's pretending the other sequels didn't happen. >> really? >> yeah. >> it's hard to take a classic and make it better. but if anyone can, it's john carpenter. who like his name implies, bilt builds the scariest moments. piece by piece. [ screams ] >> but lets our imagination drive the nail in the coffin. copd makes it hard to breathe. so to breathe better,
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i go with anoro. ♪go your own way copd tries to say, "go this way." i say, "i'll go my own way" with anoro. ♪go your own way once-daily anoro contains two medicines called bronchodilators, that work together to significantly improve lung function all day and all night. anoro is not for asthma . it contains a type of medicine that increases risk of death in people with asthma. the risk is unknown in copd. anoro won't replace rescue inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than once a day. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition, high blood pressure, glaucoma, prostate, bladder, or urinary problems. these may worsen with anoro. call your doctor if you have worsened breathing, chest pain, mouth or tongue swelling, problems urinating, vision changes, or eye pain while taking anoro. ask your doctor about anoro. ♪go your own way get your first prescription free at anoro.com. she's had a tiny cough.
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anif you've got a lifee. you gotta swiffer >> i'm charles kuralt. one day in 1967, i thought i would take a ride and see what was going on in the countryside. >> it was 50 years ago this week that charles kuralt first went on the road. this morning, steve hartman throws it into reverse and takes us back to a start of the journey to the heart of america.
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♪ ♪ >> reporter: the on the road motorhome wasn't the fastest way to find a news story. but charles kuralt wasn't looking for fast or news for that matter. at lest not in the traditional sense. no, this man was a different kind of journalist. he didn't investigate people. he simply admired them. >> hey, now. >> humiliated by 104-year-old man. >> oh. >> he said he was the best. and i trusted him. >> there you go. >> nobody could accuse you of wasting any string lately. >> no. >> charles kuralt. legendary creator of on the road died 20 years ago. but his biggest fan is alive and well. >> what year did you start at cbs. >> 1966. >> izzy blackmon was the cameraman and invited to the museum outside of detroit where on the road is celebrated 365.
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>> recognize this? >> yeah, oh, my. the exhibit here for years. but this was his first time seeing it. charles had a saying, you make my heart beat fast. >> izzy there for most of his career. the highs and the highers. the man moaning in the background is our cameraman. mr. blackmon put through a snap roll by a little old lady of 80. izzy says on the road almost dent get off the ground. management wasn't thrilled with the idea at first. >> why would they say no? >> they didn't see what he saw, i guess. what i heard was that the telephones lit up pretty hard that night when they first one was on. >> really? >> people said it is about time we saw a little something else about america. >> three miles to the bushel. >> the beginning of one of most successful segments in tv news history. which is why it saddens him that charles kuralt is fading from
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our collective consciousness. people are forgetting who started this? >> what's that guy's name? >> charles kuralt. >> doesn't ring a bell? >> asked a group of cbs interns who has heard of charles kuralt. look way in the back, you see two people raise their hand. one of them was my intern. >> what is lost if america forgets who charles kuralt is? >> i don't thinning you are going to let them do that. that's your mission. keep doing it. keep us in awe. >> fortunately, there is still plenty of awe left in america. in fact, what strikes me today is the same thing that struck kuralt. ♪ hallelujah >> despite the negative headlines, the back roads connect up a country that still seems rather fine and strong and enduring. >> yes, the motorhome may be retired, but thanks to izzy and charles kuralt.
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today there is still a vehicle for telling the stories
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if you've get a chance to visit china you may be surprised by translations on billboards and restaurant menus. ben tracy sorts it out. >> how often do you see a bad translation? >> around 20 minutes. >> laura jao a tour guide in beijing for ten years. so she has seen plenty of these. signs where something definitely got lost in translation. >> i think, it is probably because we don't really use english. >> there are helpful reminders to please wait outside. remember to enjoy the fresh air after you civilized urinating. >> why do you think translations were so bad on so many signs? >> to be honest. i think it is because lots of people lazy. >> lazy. >> yes. directly put it online.
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translate. and designer may not really know english at all. >> i assume the shoes in there are not actually old? >> new shoes. traditional style. >> how traditional beijing shoes becomes old beijing shoes. >> also how a warning not to step on the growing grass, can become i like your smile, but unlook you put your shoes on my face. >> most of us find this pretty funny. the chinese government find it pretty embarrassing the they haver e eissued the guide. translations how to write everything from sun bathing to ski resort to clothing time, and under construction. so, under the new guidelines. the once widely used execution and progress, will become, under construction. the highly offensive, deformed men's toilet sign, will now read, accessible toilet. china first tried to rid itself of embarrassing chinglish.
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where it became chinese ethnic park. >> that's probably not something i would order. but a harder problem to solve may be all the menu items that sound less than appetizing. >> of this dish is called spicy beauty shoes. what exactly is that? >> spicy, because flavor is spicy. and the, it is supposed to make you beautiful. and it is a picture, pig's foot. off a you beautiful? >> supposed to. after guidelines, laura expects most chinglish signs will be tossed in the rubbish. >> chinese people we are good at following rules. government give you a list what it should be. then everything become easier. >> sadly it may no longer be easy to find the exotic romance zone. ben tracy, beijing. that's the "overnight news" for this none day. from the cbs broadcast center in
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new york city. i'm elaine quijano. captioning funded by cbs it's monday, october 30th, 2017. this is the "cbs morning news." >> here comes fisher. astros win it. >> the astros take the lead over the dodgers in the world series in a dramatic game that might be one for the record books. oscar winner kevin spacey apologizes after being accused of making sexual advances toward a 14-year-old boy a decade ago. and the russian investigation heats up as a grand jury

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